organization-and-attitude-arte-maren-natural-laws-of-management-admin-scale

“If you really feel that you have something of value, that’s an attitude that others can perceive.”

 

There are several major factors to understand as regards expansion: the amount of activity we generate outside of a business which drives in the traffic to the business; the capacity to efficiently handle what’s driven in; and lastly, the quality of the product or service that is delivered to the consumer.

All too often, what is driven in simply walks out the back door, meaning that the capacity of the business was not up to handling the traffic. And if so, it must be handled.

Anything which stops or delays the flows of a business or delays or puts a customer or product on WAIT is an enemy of that business.

Good management carefully isolates all stops on its flow lines and eradicates them to increase speed of flows.1

A full understanding of VFPs [Valuable Final Products] by all those on the “front lines” dealing directly with the buying public is vital. Customers, clients and patients are aware of when they are actually getting a VFP, whether they can verbalize the VFP or not. A failure to deliver impacts the customer on a personal level also, a point to consider carefully.

A staff idling in Reception, offhand handling of callers, wrong address or names misspelled drive off customers. Aside from simply blocking sign ups,2 these points also REDUCE CUSTOMER STATUS.3

The ability to reach out into the environment and make something occur is vital to expansion. Sometimes, however, to get a company solvent, it’s not only necessary to get involved in its marketing, it’s necessary to fix the capacity of the business to handle substantial traffic—at which point, magically, it starts getting traffic!

As mentioned earlier, in order to organize anything, it is only necessary to look at the end result and then work backwards from that.  At the very start, we can begin with attitude.

Some business owners think that they are lucky when a customer walks in the door. If you don’t feel that your customer is lucky, you had better take another look at your operation. Knowing that you are delivering a product that is extremely valuable exudes a certainty. When that person walks into your business, it is that person who is fortunate that you are there to provide a service he or she needs.

One of the best marketing campaigns I’ve ever run was based on this viewpoint. In the early 1970’s, I got a call from the Narconon [drug rehabilitation program] representative in the state of Washington, and he said, “The state needs drug programs and we might be able to get in if we go there and…” I said, “Call the State Director of Prisons and let him know that I will fly to Washington and do a tour of all their installations. If we think that they deserve our program and their facilities are conducive to what we’re doing, we will bring it to them.” The public relations rep said, “You’ve got to be joking. I’m not calling them and telling them that.” I convinced him to do it and he did. He called back amazed, saying that they gave me an appointment. We went in and I conducted a check of their facilities.

The Seattle newspaper ran an article the next day. It said, “State May Get Drug Program.” If you really feel that you have something of value, that’s an attitude that others can perceive. I truly believed that we produced something valuable—that they were fortunate, not I.

 

-Arte Maren
Professional Speaker, Writer and Business Consultant
Author of  The Natural Laws of Management: The Admin Scale

 

1 Hubbard, “Speed of Service,” Policy Letter of 3 January 1968, Organization Executive Course.
2 Sign Up: “Enlist in an organization; also, register or subscribe to something.” Answers.com.
3 Hubbard, “The Org Image,” Policy Letter of 17 June 1969, Organization Executive Course.

 

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